A trailer for the Minisails (Part IV: An old one updated)

Double stacker dinghy trailer

My beloved huge Citroën C5 break had to go (by now exported and a comfortable Taxi in Krakow I think/hope).
A more family-budget friendly 2009 Citroën Xsara Picasso came in. OK… with tow ball!
Bought some matching lovely second hand roofbars short after to get a boat on top of it but looking at them, measuring only 50 cm between the bars, I thought it would be better to forget about roof-racking a dingy with the Xsara.
Trailing it will be the way of transport from now on and I handed over the trailer I made 20 years ago to a welder to make it fit at least two boats.
Look at the result, with a bit of luck two Minisails will fit in the lower section, that would make it a triple stacker.

To be continued without a doubt. We’ll need to make the trip to Keyhaven UK soon, with two maybe three Minisails.

Double stacker dinghy trailer

Double stacker dinghy trailer

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A trailer for the Minisails (Part III: finally finished)

Remember the mini trailer I bought last October; Well I used the re-built for the first time today. Can’t tell much about it’s trailing qualities really because when towing it I can’t see it in the rear view mirror, nor do I feel anything in the car’s behaviour, zip, nothing, it’s like it isn’t there. On the other hand I didn’t hear any banging trailer noises either-typical when trailing a light trailer- so I guess it’s a success. If only I had a pair of spare wheels for it, I would venture trailing the set further than my home town. Work done but in progress as well it seems. Minisail trailer Here is the original Lama 240 when I got it home

Lama 240 mini trailer

Lama 240 mini trailer

A trailer for the Minisails (Part II)

Old trailer

Old trailer for light dingy

The old worn out trailer in my workshop I used for years to park hulls on (and maneuver around when needed) will have to go. I can stack boats up to a point but not trailers. I’ll use it’s trailing boom and bolt it to my Lama trailer frame. Took some pictures just before I disassembled it. Don’t know exactly why but I was always charmed by it’s symplicity and somehow it looks well designed. It’s dating from a period where steel was cheap, the item is heavy. The wall thickness of the boom is 5mm and you can happily stand on the fenders, neither the supports or the fenders will be impressed. Might pull the hubs off this winter and see if it’s possible to fit a new set of bearing-hub-wheel-tyres. After all it’s a fun oldtimer that’s only missing a fresh set of nuts and bolts. Greetings, Ronny IMG_5831 IMG_5829 IMG_5833 IMG_5838 IMG_5850